Members of Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido’s team kidnapped, security forces claim they had corona… – Fox News

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Members of Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido's team kidnapped
Members of Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido's team kidnapped

Five additional members of Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido’s team have been kidnapped, according to local reports on Monday – bringing the total to 10 who are now languishing behind bars.

A source in Caracas confirmed to Fox News that five officials were abducted over the past week, and a further five were taken by security last year. As of the most recent seizures, two were allegedly charged with marijuana possession at the National Police headquarters, known by its Spanish acronym FAES. Two more were taken this morning on unclear charges.

“Authorities said they were looking for COVID-19 cases and took them away,” the insider said. “That was the excuse, anyway.”

Opposition leader Juan Guaido waves to supporters during a rally at Bolivar Plaza in Chacao, a municipality of Caracas, Venezuela, on Tuesday.

Opposition leader Juan Guaido waves to supporters during a rally at Bolivar Plaza in Chacao, a municipality of Caracas, Venezuela, on Tuesday. (AP)

Of those kidnapped last year, at least one – Guaido’s Chief of Staff Robert Marroe, who was arrested last March – faces charges that include acts of terrorism.

CORONAVIRUS HITS DESPERATE VENEZUELA’S ALREADY BROKEN HEALTH CARE SYSTEM

The National Police remains under the control of Venezuelan president Nicolas Maduro, who for more than a year has not been recognized as the country’s legitimate leader by the United States and more than 100 other countries.

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro holds up a copy of his country's case taken to the International Criminal Court regarding U.S. sanctions during a press conference at Miraflores presidential palace in Caracas, Venezuela, on Friday.

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro holds up a copy of his country’s case taken to the International Criminal Court regarding U.S. sanctions during a press conference at Miraflores presidential palace in Caracas, Venezuela, on Friday.

The seizures come just a week after the U.S. Department of Justice unsealed a searing criminal indictment against Maduro and several “co-conspirators,” accusing them of an array of narcotics and trafficking-related crimes, including efforts to smuggle drugs into the United States, and putting multimillion-dollar bounties beside their names.

TRUMP ADMINISTRATION PROPOSES NEW ELECTIONS FOR VENEZUELA, IN EXCHANGE FOR SANCTIONS RELIEF

Despite the latest indictment, coupled with a laundry list of economic sanctions, Maduro has maintained his position at the helm in the capital Caracas, overseeing the struggling socialist regime and commanding the security forces.

The indictment of a functioning head of state was highly unusual and bound to ratchet up tensions between Washington and Caracas. However, the U.S. has long accused Maduro and his government of human rights abuses, torture, corruption, and paving the way for cartels, terrorist groups and traffickers to exploit the oil-swathed nation, once the wealthiest in Latin America.

Zoraida Silva, 26, feeds her six month baby Jhon Angel, at a soup kitchen in The Cemetery slum, in Caracas, Venezuela. Silva said that she can not afford to have 3 meals a day, and she has been eating at the soup kitchen for two years ago. According to a survey recently published by the U.N. World Food Program, one of every three Venezuelans cope with food insecurity, unable to get enough food to meet their basic dietary needs. 

Zoraida Silva, 26, feeds her six month baby Jhon Angel, at a soup kitchen in The Cemetery slum, in Caracas, Venezuela. Silva said that she can not afford to have 3 meals a day, and she has been eating at the soup kitchen for two years ago. According to a survey recently published by the U.N. World Food Program, one of every three Venezuelans cope with food insecurity, unable to get enough food to meet their basic dietary needs.  (AP)

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As it stands, Venezuela is considered to be one of the world’s worst humanitarian crisis.

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About Noticias de Nueva Esparta Venezuela 4251 Articles
The Publisher: Juan Rodulfo, Defined by Nature: Planet Earth Habitant, Human, Son of Eladio Rodulfo & Briceida Moya, Brother of Gabriela, Gustavo & Katiuska, Father of Gabriel & Sofia; Defined by the Society: Venezuelan Citizen (Human Rights Limited by default), Friend of many, Enemy of few, Neighbor, Student/Teacher/Student, Worker/Supervisor/Manager/Leader/Worker, Husband of Katty/ Ex-Husband of K/Husband of Yohana; Defined by the US Immigration System: Legal Alien; Defined by the Gig Economy: Independent Contractor Form 1099; Studies in classroom: Master Degree in Human Resources Management, English, Chinese Mandarin; Studies at the real world: Human Behavior; Studies at home: Webmaster SEO, Graphic Web Apps Design, Internet & Social Media Marketing, Video Production, You Tube Branding, Trading, Import-Exports, Affiliate Marketing, Cooking, Laundry, Home Cleaning; Work experience: Public-Private-Entrepreneur Sectors; Other Definitions: Bitcoin Evangelist, Human Rights Peace and Love Advocate. Author of: Why Maslow: How to use his theory to stay in Power Forever (EN/SP), Asylum Seekers (EN/SP), Manual for Gorillas: 9 Rules to be the “Fer-pect” Dictator (EN/SP) Social Media profiles: Twitter/FB/Instagram/VK/Linkedin/Sina Weibo: @rodulfox